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Search results for 'Miss Annie Miles'

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  • Sharlot Hall and group at Highway Monument dedication

    Sharlot Hall,third from right standing at dedication of Highway Monument. From left, E. H. West, Miss Annie Louise Smith, George B. Shaffer, Shelton M. Donald, James L. Edwards, Budig (holding Joan) Devenfont, J. W. Walden, Dr. E. C. Sevle, Fred Guirey, Riley Bryant, Sharlot Hall, Honorable Nellie T. Bush, and Miss George Anne Shaffer. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizonas vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Fred M. Guirey ( b. 1909, d. 1984) was an engineer and architect in Maricopa County, who was the first landscape engineer hired by the Arizona Highway Commission. In that capacity he initiated one of the first highway beautification programs in the country. In 1952, he was appointed a member of the Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Commission, on which he served for 25 years. He was instrumental in the acquisition of 93,000 acres of regional parks and the Black Canyon Shooting Range and Recreation Area. Nellie Trent Bush (b. November 29,1888, d. October 27,1963) was born in Missouri and arrived in Mesa, Arizona in 1893 with her family. She taught school in Glendale until moving with her husband, Joe, to Parker in 1915, where they established a hotel, bank, power plant and electric company and where Mrs. Bush taught and became principal at the Parker school. She also became the first woman to obtain a ferryboat license to navigate the Colorado River. In 1918 she began her political career as school trustee, followed by a term as justice of the peace, and later by six sessions in the Arizona House. In 1934 she became the state’s second female state senator. She obtained a law degree from the University of Arizona in 1924, and also in the 1920’s was the first woman appointed as U. S. Commissioner for Arizona, served as president of the local bank, and on state committees investigating corruption in the state Highway Department. She achieved national recognition as “Admiral of Arizona’s Navy” during a controversy over the construction of the Parker Dam. At the time of her death, she was serving on the Parker City Council.

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  • Schmucker, Earl T

    Hampton Funeral Home Records: Had lived in Prescott for 14 years, in Arizona for 16 years. COD: generalized peritonitis due to a pelvis abscess. Remains were shipped to the Barnard Funeral Home in Hawarden, Iowa for final arrangements., OBIT: Prescott Courier, 11 Jan 1966: He came to Arizona about 1950 from Rapid City, South Dakota where he had been in the auto-electric business from 1915 to 1943. During the latter part of WWII he had worked as a shop foreman in the aircraft maintainence department at the Rapid City Air Force Base. Survivors included his wife, Zelma of Prescott; a son, Bernie of Mitchell, South Dakota; a daughter, Miss Junelda Schmucker of Prescott and 2 grandchidren. The remains were shipped to Haywardan, Iowa for the final arrangements.

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  • Bronson, Charles Miles

    Had lived in Arizona his entire life. Had been living in Mayer. COD: lung cancer. Memory Chapel (now Heritage Mortuary) was in charge of the arrangements. YCRR, NOTE: a cremation date of 8 Aug 1995 was found in the files of the Mt. View crematorium.

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  • Riebeling, Annie Dolly

    Death Certificate: COD: coronary thrombosis & diabetes. Resided in Prescott for 39 years, Arizona for 50 years - - Mt. View Cemetery records - Ruffner Funeral Home - ,OBIT: Prescott Courier, 3 Jul 1942: Moved to Prescott in 1903 from Phoenix. Previously had lived in Lenox, Massachusetts, Sapin, South Dakota and Phoenix. Husband was a former Yavapai County Assessor. Was known as "Mother Riebeling". Survivors included her husband; a son, Charles G. Riebeling; 3 daughters, Mrs. A. M. (Ina) Crawford, Mrs. C. D. (Helen) Rhodes and Miss Emma Riebeling, all of Prescott and 3 grandchildren. Ruffner Funeral Home (now Ruffner Wakeklin Funeral Home) was in charge of the arrangements.

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  • Howington, Vernon Herod

    OBIT: Prescott Courer, 26 Nov 1966: Had lived in Arizona for 24 years. His residence was in Seligman, Yavapai, Arizona. He had moved to Arizona from New Mexico. Survivors included his wife, Ruth of Seligman; 3 daughters, Mrs. Patsy Laughlin of Prescott, Miss Vicky Lynn Howington of Seligman and Mrs. Bobby Jo Evans of Melvera, Arkansas; a son, Lst Lt. Marvin Howington, USAF; 3 brothers, Frank of Calipatria, California. A. E.of Phoenix and Marvin of Lovick, Texas; 4 sisters, Mrs. Leona Cooper of Redding, California, Mrs. Ethel Bolin of Hawkins, Texas, Mrs. Annie Bolin of Frisco, Texas and Mrs. Dee Alve Ridgeway of Pittsburg, California and 9 grandchildren. Burial was in the Mt. View Cemetery in Prescott.

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  • Winstead, Annie (Miss)

    Death certificate: COD: TB. ÿDC signed by her mother. ÿBody was shipped to Berkley, California.

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  • Greenwood, Nathaniel Buck

    Death certificate; COD: unavoidable automobile accident on U.S. Highway 89 8 miles south of Prescott. He had been in the area for 1 week. Had been living in Long Beach, California. ÿRemains were shipped to Phoenix, Maricopa, Arizona for the final arrangements.

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  • Miles, Annie

    Death Cert--65 yrs old, COD broncho pneumonia resulting after fractured hip & senile dementia, died at Arizona State Hospital, resided at 216 South Marina Street, both parents born in Ireland. Surviving here was a sister, Mrs. Kate Stone of Prescott, a nephew, Warren Stone of Phoenix and a niece in California.

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  • Curry, Irene

    OBIT The Prescott Herald 10 Mar 1905--The 15 year old girl had been ill for a long time. ÿShe was taken to Phoenix by her mother (Katie Stone)and her aunt, Annie Miles, about three weeks before her death. ÿShe was given the best of medical care while in Phoenix. OBIT Arizona Journal-Miner 11 Mar 1905--The funeral was held at the Catholic church. OBIT Prescott Weekly Courier 10 Mar 1905 1:6 Warren W. Stone (Irene's stepfather) had remained in Prescott and was notified of the death by telegram. ÿCOD heart disease.

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  • Sharlot Hall, C. M. Holbert and Winifred Hynds

    Sharlot Hall, Charles M. Holbert and Winifred A. Hynds, r. to l. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Charles M. Holbert (b. 1862, d. 1948) met James Hall, Sharlot's father, in Kansas prior to their move to Arizona. He envisioned opening a recreation park in Phoenix's south mountain area and with Miss Hall's assistance, he was named the first custodian of South Mountain Park. He held the position for 10 years, guiding and providing emergency aid to tourists. Known as "The Old Man Of The Mountain," his name was given to a trail across the mountains.

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  • Sharlot Hall, Governor Hunt, and Grace Sparkes

    Sharlot Hall, Governor George W. Hunt, and Grace Sparkes, r. to l. at the dedication of the Blythe Bridge. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. George Wylie Paul Hunt (b. November, 1859, d. December, 1934) was born in Huntsville, Missouri and came to Arizona in 1881 with a group of prospectors. He served as president of the Old Dominion Trading Company as well as of the Old Dominion Bank before entering public life. He served as Globe's first mayor, treasurer of Gila County, and as a state legislator. In 1911, he was elected the first governor of the new state of Arizona, and he served in that capacity for nearly 15 nonconsecutive years, finally leaving office in 1932. He was married to the former Helen Duett until her death in 1931. Grace Marian Sparkes (b. January 21, 1893, d. October 22,1963) was born in Lead, South Dakota and moved to Arizona with her family in 1906. She worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce from 1911 until 1945, serving as secretary until resigning to oversee her mining interests in Cochise County. During her tenure, she helped organize the Smoki People of Prescott and joined Sharlot Hall in efforts to establish a permanent reservation for the Yavapai Indians near Prescott. Other contributions of Miss Sparkes included the management of the Prescott Frontier Days rodeo, the obtaining of financing for the Hassayampa Hotel, and the securing of the approval of federal projects including the establishment of a Veterans Hospital, the renovation of Tuzigoot Indian Ruins and the restoration of the Governor's Mansion. She served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for an Arizona exhibit at the Chicago Center of Progress World's Fair of 1934, and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association. She died in Bisbee, Arizona.

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  • Sharlot Hall, Grace and Jack Sparkes, and Dan Seaman

    Grace Sparkes, Dan Seaman, Sharlot Hall, and Jack Sparkes, l. to r. at the dedication of the Blythe Bridge. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Grace Marian Sparkes (b. January 21, 1893, d. October 22, 1963) was born in Lead, South Dakota and moved to Arizona with her family in 1906. She worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce from 1911 until 1945, serving as secretary until resigning to oversee her mining interests in Cochise County. During her tenure, she helped organize the Smoki People of Prescott and joined Sharlot Hall in efforts to establish a permanent reservation for the Yavapai Indians near Prescott. Other contributions of Miss Sparkes included the management of the Prescott Frontier Days Rodeo, the obtaining of financing for the Hassayampa Hotel, and the securing of the approval of federal projects including the establishment of a Veterans Hospital, the renovation of Tuzigoot Indian Ruins and the restoration of the Governor's Mansion. She served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for an Arizona exhibit at the Chicago Century of Progress World's Fair of 1934, and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association. She died in Bisbee, Arizona. Daniel J. Seaman (b. 1892, d. November, 1969) was born in Denver to Dan J. and Minnie Atkinson Seaman and moved to Prescott as a child. He married Eileen Bennett in 1932. He started the Prescott Printing Company and published The Morning Star newspaper from 1923 to 1927. He was managing editor of the Prescott Evening Courier for 18 years and served as superintendent of the Arizona Pioneers' Home during 1931 and 1932. He was a director of the Prescott Chamber of Commerce, chairman of the Yavapai County Democratic party and served as Justice of the Peace of the Prescott precinct in Yavapai County for many years. He was also a charter member of the Smoki People and helped establish the Sharlot Hall Museum. Jack Sparkes (b. , d. May,1939) was the brother of Grace Sparkes. He suffered from ill health most of his life, and when he was well enough, he worked at the Owl Drugstore. He was married to Genevieve McNalley, a teacher in Wickenburg. He was in his 40's when he died.

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  • Thomas, Violet Annie (Mugford)

    $5.00

    Violet Annie (Mugford) Thomas Original Obituary

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