Log In

Log In

Forgot Your Password?

Cart Subtotal: $0.00

Search results for 'Stone building under construction at museum'

Items 1 to 15 of 54420 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction
Switch View
  • Sharlot Hall stone building at museum

    Sharlot Hall stone building at museum .In 1933, the Civil Works Administration, an agency of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, began construction from native rock and pine logs of “a permanent building for the preservation of valuable early-day Arizona relics.” Sharlot Hall later called the building “the house of a thousand hands.” It was completed in 1936 and was later named the Sharlot Hall Building, serving as the museum's primary exhibit space, as well as Sharlot Hall's living quarters.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    This is the beginning of the park, ballfield and tennis court construction. In the background is the oldest Smoki Museum building and to the right one can see the headstones from the Citizen Cemetery. In this picture the construction crew is laboring with the ground to create the retaining wall for the tennis courts. Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of One of the Smoki Museum Buildings, Prescott, Arizona

    This is construction of one of the Smoki Museum building, which is, today, adjacent to the Ken Lindley Park and the Grace Sparkes Activity Center. In 1922, Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott, Arizona that today makes up the Ken Lindley Park and Ballfield, the Smoki Museum and the old Arizona National Guard Armory. Initially the land was to be used for a Park but upon Ada Joslin's request, the City donated part of the land to the Smoki organization for their museum and pueblo and to Arizona National Guard to build an Armory, which is currently the Grace Sparkes Activity Center. In 1934, the construction of the the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery, which is adjacent to the Smoki Museum and behind the Grace Sparkes Activity Center.

    Learn More |
  • Constuction of One of the Smoki Museum Buildings, Prescott, Arizona

    This is construction of one of the Smoki Museum building, which is, today, adjacent to the Ken Lindley Park and the Grace Sparkes Activity Center. In 1922, Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott, Arizona that today makes up the Ken Lindley Park and Ballfield, the Smoki Museum and the old Arizona National Guard Armory. Initially the land was to be used for a Park but upon Ada Joslin's request, the City donated part of the land to the Smoki organization for their museum and pueblo and to Arizona National Guard to build an Armory, which is currently the Grace Sparkes Activity Center. In 1934, the construction of the the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery, which is adjacent to the Smoki Museum and behind the Grace Sparkes Activity Center.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of One of the Smoki Museum Buildings, Prescott, Arizona

    This is construction of one of the Smoki Museum building, which is, today, adjacent to the Ken Lindley Park and the Grace Sparkes Activity Center. In 1922, Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott, Arizona that today makes up the Ken Lindley Park and Ballfield, the Smoki Museum and the old Arizona National Guard Armory. Initially the land was to be used for a Park but upon Ada Joslin’s request, the City donated part of the land to the Smoki organization for their museum and pueblo and to Arizona National Guard to build an Armory, which is currently the Grace Sparkes Activity Center. In 1934, the construction of the the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery, which is adjacent to the Smoki Museum and behind the Grace Sparkes Activity Center.

    Learn More |
  • Back of stone building and pile of wood at Sharlot Hall Museum

    Back of stone bjilding and pile of wood at Sharlot Hall Museum. Photo taken when Mr. and Mrs. Ernst Behrend visited museum.

    Learn More |
  • Sharlot Hall, Major Doran & Allan Doyle

    Major Doran (left), Sharlot M. Hall (standing), Allan Doyle (right).

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    This is a construction crew working at approximately the end of Willis Street and Arizona Avenue in front of the Smoki Museum area. This photo looks westward down Willis towards Thumb Butte in the background. Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Completed Construction of the Prescott City Ball Park (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    This image shows the completed structures and field for the City's multipurpose playground, ball field and track. In 1931, during the Great Depression, the grandstand was constructed as a City public worked project on the northeast corner of Gurley and Washington streets. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project. The City Park and Ballfield was renamed the "Ken Lindley Field" in 1971 in memory of Prescott's Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. Although the field and other City Park facilities have been heavily used over the years, in 1998 and 1999 the City of Prescott restored the unused grandstand for modern use and constructed a snack bar and dining area on the inside curve of the building facing the field. This adaptive use project will allow the facility to continue to be an important part of the park in the future. Generations of Prescott youth have grown up playing sports at this City Park, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    This is the southeast corner of the park or playing field with Badger Mountain or what is today call "P" Mountain in the background. Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ball field. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ball field officially renamed the "Ken Lindley Field" in memory of Prescott's Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Construction workers creating the retaining wall along Gurley Street for the City's ball field. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1971, the ball field officially renamed the "Ken Lindley Field" in memory of Prescott's Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |

Items 1 to 15 of 54420 total

per page
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5

Grid  List 

Set Ascending Direction
Switch View