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Items 1 to 15 of 1934 total

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  • The First Safford Administration: Arizona’s Time as a Benign Dictatorship

    When Arizona’s third territorial governor, Anson P. K. Safford, arrived at the Territorial Capital of Tucson in July 1869 he was met both by an enthusiastic citizenry and by a legal firestorm that threatened extended chaos in the territory. The eventual solution would include giving the new governor temporary dictatorial powers. Late in the previous year Henry P. T. Backus, an associate justice of the Territorial Supreme Court, had issued a decision that voided all the laws enacted during the third, fourth and fifth territorial legislatures (1866, 1867 and 1868) thus throwing the wheels of government into a ditch. He had ruled that the method for apportionment of Arizona’s two legislative houses had violated the territory’s Organic Act. The issue of whether or not his ruling had merit was certain to be tied up in the courts for an agonizing length of time; in the meantime local officials were enabled to pick and choose what laws to follow. 11-23-14_APKSafford Anson P. K. Safford, Arizona’s Third Territorial Governor (Photo Courtesy of Author). Judge Backus had been appointed to replace Judge William T. Howell, the primary author of the set of laws for Arizona adopted by the first territorial legislature in 1864. Backus arrived in Arizona in time to hold a term of Court at Tucson in January 1866, and in November 1868 he dropped his legal bombshell. In early 1869 he resigned when his term expired and left the territory. Previously, Governor Richard McCormick had been elected as the territory’s delegate to Congress and immediately left for Washington, leaving the reins of government in the ineffectual hands of Territorial Secretary James P. T. Carter. Carter was out of office by April 1869, replaced by Coles Bashford. Among things left undone before Mr. Safford’s arrival was the calling of the normally expected election for the sixth Territorial Legislature. The repercussions from Judge Backus’s ruling were dramatic. An interested observer, John Spring, an early Tucson schoolmaster, later wrote: “This decision had created a condition that practically left the territory without a government except in name. The regular term for holding the [1869] Territorial Legislature had passed; hence, there was no appropriation for carrying on the government. The several boards of supervisors (county commissioners) had ordered tax levied in some counties according to the acts of one legislature, and in others according to the acts of another legislature, accordingly as they approved or disapproved of Judge Backus’ decision; and in order that the money should not become a disturbing element it was generally diverted into the county fund. The Territory was indebted in the sum of $26,000, and there were no funds to meet obligations.” To wait for the courts to sort out this mess was clearly not acceptable and action was required of the governor who requested Congress for help. He needed Congress to overturn Backus’ ruling and then to grant him special powers to help bridge the gap before the legislature could next meet. 11-23-14_Backus Henry P. T. Backus, associate justice of the Territorial Supreme Court (Photo Courtesy of Author). On March 23, 1870 Congress enacted a bill that did just that. In addition to declaring that the apportionment made by the governor of Arizona Territory’s for the contended legislatures were “legal and valid under the organic act,” it also gave the governor extraordinary but temporary powers to remove and appoint township, county and district officers—both elected and appointed—“whenever in his judgment the public interest will be promoted thereby.” Additionally, the bill specified that the next election for Arizona would be held in November 1870 and the governor would apportion the legislative seats according the results of the 1870 census. The legislature thus selected would meet in January 1871, the governor’s special powers would expire and normalcy would be on its way. Mr. Spring wrote of the powers given to Governor Safford and his wise use of them: “This was a very arbitrary act, and could only be excused by the extraordinary condition of the affairs in the Territory. Mr. Safford . . . used the power so mildly that but very few people, indeed, had any knowledge that he ever had such power.” Safford’s mild approach worked so well that he never had to exercise the extraordinary powers given him and shortly the territorial government was working as enacted by the Legislature. “Days Past” is a collaborative project of the Sharlot Hall Museum and the Prescott Corral of Westerners International (www.prescottcorral.org). This and other Days Past articles are also available at www.sharlothallmuseum.org/library-archives/days-past. The public is encouraged to submit ideas for articles to dayspastprescott@gmail.com.

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  • Setting Base for Vietnam Memorial Courthouse Plaza, Prescott, Arizona

    Setting Base for Vietnam Memorial Courthouse Plaza, Prescott, Arizona, 1988

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  • Prescott Junior High School Band, Prescott, Arizona

    Prescott Junior High School Band, Prescott, Arizona, November, 1935

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  • Brothers - Chancy & John "Ben" Townsend, Jr.

    Chancy (Chauncy, Chauncey) Clarence Townsend was born July 27, 1872 in Lower Aqua Fria, Arizona/died January 25, 1931 in Jerome. John "Ben" Townsend, Jr. was born March 9, 1874 in Prescott/died November 3, 1925 in Jerome.

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  • Sharlot Hall, Grace and Jack Sparkes, and Dan Seaman

    Grace Sparkes, Dan Seaman, Sharlot Hall, and Jack Sparkes, l. to r. at the dedication of the Blythe Bridge. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Grace Marian Sparkes (b. January 21, 1893, d. October 22, 1963) was born in Lead, South Dakota and moved to Arizona with her family in 1906. She worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce from 1911 until 1945, serving as secretary until resigning to oversee her mining interests in Cochise County. During her tenure, she helped organize the Smoki People of Prescott and joined Sharlot Hall in efforts to establish a permanent reservation for the Yavapai Indians near Prescott. Other contributions of Miss Sparkes included the management of the Prescott Frontier Days Rodeo, the obtaining of financing for the Hassayampa Hotel, and the securing of the approval of federal projects including the establishment of a Veterans Hospital, the renovation of Tuzigoot Indian Ruins and the restoration of the Governor's Mansion. She served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for an Arizona exhibit at the Chicago Century of Progress World's Fair of 1934, and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association. She died in Bisbee, Arizona. Daniel J. Seaman (b. 1892, d. November, 1969) was born in Denver to Dan J. and Minnie Atkinson Seaman and moved to Prescott as a child. He married Eileen Bennett in 1932. He started the Prescott Printing Company and published The Morning Star newspaper from 1923 to 1927. He was managing editor of the Prescott Evening Courier for 18 years and served as superintendent of the Arizona Pioneers' Home during 1931 and 1932. He was a director of the Prescott Chamber of Commerce, chairman of the Yavapai County Democratic party and served as Justice of the Peace of the Prescott precinct in Yavapai County for many years. He was also a charter member of the Smoki People and helped establish the Sharlot Hall Museum. Jack Sparkes (b. , d. May,1939) was the brother of Grace Sparkes. He suffered from ill health most of his life, and when he was well enough, he worked at the Owl Drugstore. He was married to Genevieve McNalley, a teacher in Wickenburg. He was in his 40's when he died.

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  • Sharlot Hall, Governor Hunt, and Grace Sparkes

    Sharlot Hall, Governor George W. Hunt, and Grace Sparkes, r. to l. at the dedication of the Blythe Bridge. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. George Wylie Paul Hunt (b. November, 1859, d. December, 1934) was born in Huntsville, Missouri and came to Arizona in 1881 with a group of prospectors. He served as president of the Old Dominion Trading Company as well as of the Old Dominion Bank before entering public life. He served as Globe's first mayor, treasurer of Gila County, and as a state legislator. In 1911, he was elected the first governor of the new state of Arizona, and he served in that capacity for nearly 15 nonconsecutive years, finally leaving office in 1932. He was married to the former Helen Duett until her death in 1931. Grace Marian Sparkes (b. January 21, 1893, d. October 22,1963) was born in Lead, South Dakota and moved to Arizona with her family in 1906. She worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce from 1911 until 1945, serving as secretary until resigning to oversee her mining interests in Cochise County. During her tenure, she helped organize the Smoki People of Prescott and joined Sharlot Hall in efforts to establish a permanent reservation for the Yavapai Indians near Prescott. Other contributions of Miss Sparkes included the management of the Prescott Frontier Days rodeo, the obtaining of financing for the Hassayampa Hotel, and the securing of the approval of federal projects including the establishment of a Veterans Hospital, the renovation of Tuzigoot Indian Ruins and the restoration of the Governor's Mansion. She served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for an Arizona exhibit at the Chicago Center of Progress World's Fair of 1934, and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association. She died in Bisbee, Arizona.

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  • Sharlot Hall, President Coolidge and officials

    Phillip D. Swing, Senator Samuel M. Shortridge, Mrs. R.L. Royal, Senator Ralph Cameron, President Calvin Coolidge, Sharlot Hall, Colonel B. F. Fly, Representative John Raker, Thomas H. MacDonald, Everett Sanders, l. to r. on the occasion of Sharlot Hall's delivery of Arizona's vote in Washington. Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Samuel Morgan Shortridge (b. August 3,1861, d. January 15,1952) was a practicing attorney in San Francisco until 1920 when he was elected as a Republican Senator from California, a position he held until 1933. He was a special attorney at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. from 1939 to 1943. Thomas Harris MacDonald (b. July 23, 1881, d. April 7,1957) was a civil engineer who directed U. S. road policy for 34 years, serving under seven different U.S. Presidents. He supervised the creation of 3.5 million miles of highways, including the Alaskan Highway and the Inter-American Highway. He served as commissioner of the Bureau of Public Roads from 1939 until 1953. Calvin Coolidge (b. July 4,1872, d. January 5,1933) was the 30th President of the United States, serving from 1923 to 1929. He was a Republican lawyer from Vermont but became the Lieutenant Governor and Governor of Massachusetts before his election as U. S. Vice President in 1920. He assumed the presidency in 1923 upon the death of President Warren G. Harding and was reelected in 1924. Everett Sanders (b. March 8,1882, d. May 12, 1950) practiced law in Indiana until being elected to the U. S. House of Representatives, where he served from 1917 until 1925. In 1925 he became the personal secretary to President Coolidge and during his term he amassed a collection of presidential speeches that became known as the "Everett Sanders Papers." After the election of President Herbert Hoover, he was appointed chair of the Republican National Committee, a position he held from 1932 until 1934. Senator Ralph Henry Cameron (b. October 21,1863, d. February 12,1953) was born in Southport, Maine and arrived in Flagstaff, Arizona in 1883. He worked as a rancher and a merchant in Flagstaff and built a small hotel on the Grand Canyon's South Rim, while filing nearly 40 mining claims in the Grand Canyon and adjacent canyons. In the 1880's he was instrumental in the formation of Coconino County where he served as sheriff and later on the Board of Supervisors. In 1908 he won election as the territory's Congressional delegate, but he was unsuccessful in future elections until 1920 when he was elected a U.S. Senator. His major accomplishments as Senator were the construction of a dam on the Gila River near San Carlos and the Yuma Irrigation Project. He was defeated in the next election in 1926, however, due to charges of improper use of campaign funds, his court battles with the federal government over mining claims on the Colorado River, and his obstructionist tactics regarding the Bright Angel Trail. After his second election loss in 1932, he moved to the East, where he died in Washington, D.C. George Ulysses Young (b. February 10, 1867; d. November 26, 1926) was born in Indiana and moved to Phoenix in 1890 after a career in law in Kansas. His careers in Arizona included railroad engineer, Williams school principal, owner and publisher of the Williams News, and President and General Manager of the Madzelle Mining Company and Young Mines Company. In 1909 he was appointed territorial secretary, a position he held until Arizona achieved statehood in 1912. He served as mayor of Phoenix from 1914 until 1916 and lost two subsequent mayoral elections as well as two Gubernatorial elections. John Edward Raker (b. February 22, 1863; d. January 22, 1926) was born near Knoxville, Illinois and moved with his parents to Lassen County, California in 1873. He practiced law and served as District Attorney and Judge of the Superior Court of Modoc County. In 1911 he was elected to the United States Congress, where he served until his death. He was the primary sponsor of the Raker Act, enacted in 1914, which authorized the damming of the Tuolumne River and the flooding of the Hetch Hetchy Valley. Phillip David (“Phil”) Swing (b. November 30, 1884; d. August 8, 1963) was born in San Bernardino, California and graduated from Stanford University. He practiced law and served as city attorney, deputy district attorney of Imperial County, district attorney, Chief Counsel of the Imperial Irrigation District, and Judge of the Imperial County Superior Court. He served in the House of Representatives from 1921-1933, during which time he co-sponsored the Swing-Johnson Act which authorized Boulder Dam to bring Colorado River water to Southern California. He was a member of the California State Water Resources Board from 1945 until 1958.

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  • Sharlot Hall and group at Highway Monument dedication

    Sharlot Hall,third from right standing at dedication of Highway Monument. From left, E. H. West, Miss Annie Louise Smith, George B. Shaffer, Shelton M. Donald, James L. Edwards, Budig (holding Joan) Devenfont, J. W. Walden, Dr. E. C. Sevle, Fred Guirey, Riley Bryant, Sharlot Hall, Honorable Nellie T. Bush, and Miss George Anne Shaffer. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizonas vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Fred M. Guirey ( b. 1909, d. 1984) was an engineer and architect in Maricopa County, who was the first landscape engineer hired by the Arizona Highway Commission. In that capacity he initiated one of the first highway beautification programs in the country. In 1952, he was appointed a member of the Maricopa County Parks and Recreation Commission, on which he served for 25 years. He was instrumental in the acquisition of 93,000 acres of regional parks and the Black Canyon Shooting Range and Recreation Area. Nellie Trent Bush (b. November 29,1888, d. October 27,1963) was born in Missouri and arrived in Mesa, Arizona in 1893 with her family. She taught school in Glendale until moving with her husband, Joe, to Parker in 1915, where they established a hotel, bank, power plant and electric company and where Mrs. Bush taught and became principal at the Parker school. She also became the first woman to obtain a ferryboat license to navigate the Colorado River. In 1918 she began her political career as school trustee, followed by a term as justice of the peace, and later by six sessions in the Arizona House. In 1934 she became the state’s second female state senator. She obtained a law degree from the University of Arizona in 1924, and also in the 1920’s was the first woman appointed as U. S. Commissioner for Arizona, served as president of the local bank, and on state committees investigating corruption in the state Highway Department. She achieved national recognition as “Admiral of Arizona’s Navy” during a controversy over the construction of the Parker Dam. At the time of her death, she was serving on the Parker City Council.

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  • Sharlot Hall, John Mahony, John Duke and dog

    l. to r., John Duke, Sharlot Hall and John Mahony and dog standing beside Pauline Weaver commemorative stone at Sharlot Hall Museum. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. John Fitzgibbon Mahony (b. August 14, 1849, d. April 15, 1940) was born in County Cork, Ireland. He imigrated to the U. S. at the age of 17 and after joining General Custer's Seventh Cavalry after the Civil War, was sent to Arizona in 1866. He was primarily engaged in mining, in Arizona, California and Nevada, and he mined in Yavapai County after 1876. He served as city engineer of Prescott for nine years, during which time he was in charge of the City's water system when the first water meters were installed. He later served as superintendent of the Tonto Basin quartz mills and as engineer at the Crystal Ice Plant. Following his retirement, he was elected state commander of the United Indian War Veterans and was national commander in 1934-35. John F. Duke (b.November 12, 1845, d. January 23,1935) arrived in Arizona in 1869 as a member of General Custer's Seventh Cavalry, having served for three years in the Indian campaigns in Kansas and Nebraska. In 1875 he purchased the City ranch on Granite Creek and was engaged in dairy cattle raising and mining for many years. In later years he became the owner and operator of the St. Michael's Hotel. He was also active in the United Indian War Veterans and was elected national color bearer for life in 1931.

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  • Sharlot Hall, John Duke and John Mahony

    l. to r., John Duke, Sharlot Hall and John Mahony and dog behind at Sharlot Hall Museum. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. John Fitzgibbon Mahony (b. August 14, 1849, d. April 15, 1940) was born in County Cork, Ireland. He imigrated to the U. S. at the age of 17 and after joining General Custer's Seventh Cavalry after the Civil War, was sent to Arizona in 1866. He was primarily engaged in mining, in Arizona, California and Nevada, and he mined in Yavapai County after 1876. He served as city engineer of Prescott for nine years, during which time he was in charge of the City's water system when the first water meters were installed. He later served as superintendent of the Tonto Basin quartz mills and as engineer at the Crystal Ice Plant. Following his retirement, he was elected state commander of the United Indian War Veterans and was national commander in 1934-35. John F. Duke (b. November 12, 1845, d. January 23,1935) arrived in Arizona in 1869 as a member of General Custer's Seventh Cavalry, having served for three years in the Indian campaigns in Kansas and Nebraska. In 1875 he purchased the City ranch on Granite Creek and was engaged in dairy cattle raising and mining for many years. In later years he became the owner and operator of the St. Michael's Hotel. He was also active in the United Indian War Veterans and was elected national color bearer for life in 1931.

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  • Ferris, M.K.

    "Has mail contract, Prescott to Wickenburg route"

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Items 1 to 15 of 1934 total

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