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Search results for 'january 1, 1901'

Items 1 to 15 of 3649 total

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  • Setting Base for Vietnam Memorial Courthouse Plaza, Prescott, Arizona

    Setting Base for Vietnam Memorial Courthouse Plaza, Prescott, Arizona, 1988

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  • Iron King Mine, Yavapai County, Arizona

    Aerial views of Iron King Mine, Yavapai County, Arizona, taken May 31, 1952

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  • Rough Rider Monument, Yavapai County Courthouse, Prescott, Arizona

    This is a picture of the Rough Rider Monument located on the north side of the Yavapai County Courthouse in Prescott, Arizona. This monument has been nicknamed the Buckey O'Neill statue. Please note that there is false information printed on the postcard. First "Buckley O'Neil" should be Buckey O'Neill. Second O'Neill was not a Colonel but a Captain. Third he was killed on July 1, 1898 not July 2nd. However, he did die in the Spanish-American War on Kettle Hill in Cuba.

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  • Rough Rider Monument Dedication Ceremony, Yavapai County Courthouse, Prescott, Arizona

    Rough Rider Monument dedication ceremony and unveiling on the north side of the Yavapai County Courthouse in Prescott, Arizona. This picture was taken right before the unveiling of the bronze equestrian statue. The statue was sculpted by Solon H. Borglum to honor the many men of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Calvary better known as the Rough Riders of the Spanish-American War (1898). However, many see this statue as a dedication to American hero Captain William "Buckey" Owen O'Neill commander of Troop A who fought and died in the Spanish-American War - July 1, 1898 on Kettle Hill in Cuba. The large speaker's stand located to the lower right is where "the dedication ceremony was opened by Robert Morrison, chairman of the Monument Commission which had raised the funds for the monument. A twenty-member military band from the "Fighting Fifth" at Fort Huachuca played marches and patriotic tunes. Speeches were given by Major General A.L. Chaffee, Brig. General E.D. Thomas, and Governor J.H. Kibbey. Judge R.E. Sloan, associate justice of the Supreme Court, presented the monument. At each mention of O'Neill's name, the crowd cheered boisterously." (quoted excerpt from the Days Past article dated June 28, 1998, "Rough Rider Dedication of 1907 to be repeated this Friday" by Warren Miller - SHM Curator of Education).

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  • Rough Rider Monument Dedication Ceremony, Yavapai County Courthouse, Prescott, Arizona

    Rough Rider Monument dedication ceremony and unveiling on the north side of the Yavapai County Courthouse in Prescott, Arizona. This picture was taken right before the unveiling of the bronze equestrian statue. The statue was created to honor the many men of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Calvary better know as the Rough Riders of the Spanish-American War (1898). However, many see this statue as a dedication to American hero Captain William "Buckey" Owen O'Neill who was a local Prescottonian and died for his country on Kettle Hill in Cuba July 1, 1898 during the Spanish-American War.

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  • Rough Rider Monument Dedication Ceremony, Yavapai County Courthouse, Prescott, Arizona

    Rough Rider Monument dedication ceremony and unveiling on the north side of the Yavapai County Courthouse in Prescott, Arizona. This picture was taken right before the unveiling of the bronze equestrian statue. The statue was created to honor the many men of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Calvary better know as the Rough Riders of the Spanish-American War (1898). However, many see this statue as a dedication to American hero Captain William "Buckey" Owen O'Neill who was a local Prescottonian and died for his country on Kettle Hill in Cuba July 1, 1898 during the Spanish-American War. This view is looking southward towards the courthouse and across Gurley St. (in foreground). Note: This is the second Yavapai County Courthouse.

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  • Rough Rider Monument Dedication Ceremony, Yavapai County Courthouse, Prescott, Arizona

    Rough Rider Monument dedication ceremony and unveiling on the north side of the Yavapai County Courthouse in Prescott, Arizona. This picture was taken right before the unveiling of the bronze equestrian statue. The statue was created to honor the many men of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Calvary better know as the Rough Riders of the Spanish-American War (1898). However, many see this statue as a dedication to American hero Captain William "Buckey" Owen O'Neill who was a local Prescottonian and died for his country on Kettle Hill in Cuba July 1, 1898 during the Spanish-American War. This is a southward view looking around Gurley St. (in foreground) towards the courthouse. Note: This is the second Yavapai County Courthouse.

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  • Rough Rider Monument Dedication Ceremony, Yavapai County Courthouse, Prescott, Arizona

    Rough Rider Monument dedication ceremony and unveiling on the north side of the Yavapai County Courthouse in Prescott, Arizona. This picture was taken right after the unveiling of the bronze equestrian statue. The statue was created to honor the many men of the 1st U.S. Volunteer Calvary better know as the Rough Riders of the Spanish-American War (1898). However, many see this statue as a dedication to American hero Captain William "Buckey" Owen O'Neill who was a local Prescottonian and died for his country on Kettle Hill in Cuba July 1, 1898 during the Spanish-American War. This is a southward view looking across Gurley St. (in foreground) towards the courthouse.

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  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Avenue to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the Ken Lindley Field in memory of Prescott's Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott, Arizona now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. In 1971, the ballfield officially renamed the “Ken Lindley Field” in memory of Prescott’s Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |
  • Prescott City Park & Ballfield Grandstand (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Since 1908, the area of Prescott now known as Ken Lindley Field has been used as a public park and ballfield. Charles T. and Ada M. Joslin deeded the land to the City of Prescott in 1922. In 1931, during the Great Depression, the grandstand was constructed as a City public worked project on the northeast corner of Gurley and Washington streets. The grandstand is constructed of cast concrete in a vernacular style with a slight Art Deco influence. In 1998 and 1999 the City of Prescott restored the unused grandstand for modern use and constructed a snack bar and dining area on the inside curve of the building facing the field. This adaptive use project will allow the facility to continue to be an important part of the park in the future. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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  • Construction of Prescott City Park & Ballfield (Ken Lindley Park), Prescott, Arizona

    Construction workers creating the retaining wall along Gurley Street for the City's ball field. In 1934, the area surrounding the baseball field was defined for the construction of bleachers and tennis courts. These were constructed of native stone as a Civil Works Administration project along with the Smoki Museum and the wall around the Citizens Cemetery. Today this park takes up one entire city block and is bordered by Willis Street to the north, Arizona Ave to the east, Gurley Street to the south and Washington Avenue to the west. In 1971, the ball field officially renamed the "Ken Lindley Field" in memory of Prescott's Chief of Police, who coached and managed youth baseball in Prescott from the 1950s until his death in 1971. The park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Learn More |

Items 1 to 15 of 3649 total

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