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Sharlot Hall, Alice and William Tipton in bi-plane above clouds
Sharlot M. Hall at eighteen years old
Sharlot Hall and Samuel Dickson at Blythe Bridge dedication
Sharlot Hall, Kate Cory and Mrs. Luxmoore
Sharlot M. Hall and her Aunt Mary "May" Boblett
Adeline Hall seated with book in lap
Rosa Boblett
Sharlot M. Hall petting two dogs at Orchard Ranch
Sharlot standing beside camp bed
Sharlot Hall seated in chair before baskets
Orchard Ranch ruins from 2-story side
Orchard Ranch in foreground, hill and mountain behind
Sharlot M. Hall and Molly Behrend at Sharlot Hall Museum
Sharlot Hall standing by saguaro cactus
James Knox Polk Hall Casket
Sharlot Hall's dog, Watch, seated
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Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard at right

Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard at right

Orchard Ranch behind fence with orchard trees at right. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Sharlot M. Hall with Curly Bangs

Sharlot M. Hall with Curly Bangs

Sharlot M. Hall with curly bangs - this is a head & shoulders shot.


Sharlot Hall and large group of first movie colony

Sharlot Hall and large group of first movie colony

Sharlot with group of officials and movie people on set of first movie at the Granite Dells. From left to right bottom row: Goldstein (Manager)(3), Sharlot Hall (5), Morris Goldwater (6). Middle row: John Robinson (1), Grace Sparks (2)Pete Castner (5), Margaret Hershfeld (6), Chris Totton (7), W.P. Stewart (11). Top row: Malcom Frazier (3), Dave Biles (4), Cornick (7) Herndon Norris (8), Tony Johns (9), Onos Jett (10). Others are actors. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. David H. Biles (b. August 5, 1874, d. January 4,1959) was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi and moved to Prescott in 1900. Following the 1900 fire, he formed a partnership with Gerald Shelly, and they opened a men’s furnishing store in the St. Michael’s Hotel. He married Ethel T. Shull in 1904 and also in 1904, he moved his store with his new partner, Archie Lockhart, and operated it as Biles-Lockhart Clothing Company. In 1932 he was elected County Treasurer, a position he held for four years until being elected and serving for 12 years as County Assessor. His active charity work included the operation of a free employment agency. Morris Goldwater (b. January 16, 1852, d. April 11, 1939) was born in London, England to Michael and Sarah Goldwater. Michael and his brother, Joseph, operated retail stores in rural Arizona and Phoenix, and in 1876 Michael opened a store in Prescott, which was managed by Morris. Morris and his brothers, Joe and Baron (the father of Barry Goldwater, the Republican Party’s Presidential candidate in 1964), expanded the business into two stores. Morris established the Prescott Mine Exchange, was an organizer of the Prescott National Bank, the Prescott Rifles, and the Dudes volunteer fire company, and served in the Arizona Legislature. As Mayor of Prescott, a position he held for 22 nonconsecutive years, he led the construction of the city’s first water system and the Goldwater Dam, and the first paving of streets. In 1964 when Prescott celebrated its 100th anniversary, he was honored as Man of the Century. Herndon J. Norris (b. January 1, 1890, d. February 12, 1965) was born in Flagstaff, Arizona and was educated in Prescott, Yale University and the University of Virginia law school. He practiced law in Prescott until 1923 when he moved to California and opened a women’s apparel manufacturing business. He was a co-founder of the Smoki People, serving as second chief of Smoki in 1923. Edward A. Kastner (b. February 7,1868, d. July 22, 1933) was born in Canada and moved to Prescott in his 20’s. He was the owner of a small confectionery which eventually grew into the Piggly Wiggly Kastner store in downtown Prescott. He was an active civic leader during the 40+ years of his Prescott residence. Grace Marian Sparkes (b.January 21,1893, d. October 22, 1963) was born in Lead, South Dakota and moved to Arizona with her family in 1906. She worked for the Prescott Chamber of Commerce from 1911 until 1945, serving as secretary until resigning to oversee her mining interests in Cochise County. During her tenure, she helped organize the Smoki People of Prescott and joined Sharlot Hall in efforts to establish a permanent reservation for the Yavapai Indians near Prescott. Other contributions of Mrs. Sparkes included the management of the Prescott Frontier Days rodeo, the financing of the Hassayampa Hotel, and the securing of the approval of federal projects including the establishment of a Veterans Hospital, the renovation of Tuzigoot Indian Ruins and the restoration of the Governor’s Mansion. She served on the Arizona State Board of Welfare, was coordinator for an Arizona exhibit at the Chicago Century of Progress World’s Fair of 1934, and was volunteer secretary of the Northern Arizona State Fair Association. Anthony Arthur (“Tony”) Johns (b. June 10, 1865; d. May 24, 1944) was born in Cornwall, England. He came to the Prescott area in 1882 to mine, and followed various mining interests in British Columbia and California before returning to Prescott to stay. He obtained citizenship in 1890 and married Cora Weaver in 1892. They had no children. He was heavily involved in community and state organizations. He was Chief of the Prescott Volunteer Fire Department, Undersheriff for Yavapai County, Superintendent of the Northern Arizona Fair, one of the incorporators of the Prescott Historical Society and Arizona Historical Society, Chairman of the Arizona State Fair Commission, and member of the Arizona Board of Regents. His political career included serving in the Arizona House of Representatives for Yavapai County and later as Speaker of the House. He also served as President of the Arizona Senate. He was chairman for the Democratic Party State Central Committee, and was appointed member of the State Highway Commission in 1932. He served as both secretary and president of the Aubrey Investment Co. which had interests in roads, mining, cattle and wool. He was a major force in the Arizona Wool Growers Association as president from 1923-1937. Malcolm Frazier was the Secretary of the Prescott Chamber of Commerce. Onas Jett worked for the Arizona Power Company. John Robinson was a member of the Rotary Club.


Sharlot Hall stone building at museum

Sharlot Hall stone building at museum

Sharlot Hall stone building at museum .In 1933, the Civil Works Administration, an agency of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, began construction from native rock and pine logs of “a permanent building for the preservation of valuable early-day Arizona relics.” Sharlot Hall later called the building “the house of a thousand hands.” It was completed in 1936 and was later named the Sharlot Hall Building, serving as the museum's primary exhibit space, as well as Sharlot Hall's living quarters.


Sharlot M. Hall with lace shawl on head

Sharlot M. Hall with lace shawl on head

Sharlot Hall with lace shawl around her head.


Mrs. R.L. Royal, Senator Ralph Cameron, Sharlot M. Hall & B.P. Lester

Mrs. R.L. Royal, Senator Ralph Cameron, Sharlot M. Hall & B.P. Lester

From left to right - Mrs. R.L. Royal, U.S. Senator Ralph Cameron, Sharlot M. Hall, B. P. Lester, and unidentified woman.


Horses at Orchard Ranch

Horses at Orchard Ranch

Horses at Orchard Ranch. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Sharlot in wide high-necked collar

Sharlot in wide high-necked collar

Sharlot in wide high-necked collar facing left, cropped from 1928-001-i033.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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  • Water windmill at Orchard Ranch

    Water windmill at Orchard Ranch with James Hall standing below. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Washington School Kindergarten class at Governor's Mansion at Sharlot Hall Museum

    Washington School Kindergarten class in front of Governor's Mansion on Sharlot Hall Museum Grounds, Prescott, Arizona, c. 1928

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  • Uncle Dick Thomas of Dewey

    Uncle Dick Thomas of Dewey. On the back of 1928-001-i324, Edward Hall on horseback.

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  • Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress

    Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress & floral hat taken when she worked on the "Out West" magazine in California.

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  • Tree on Orchard Ranch

    Tree on hill above Orchard Ranch.

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  • Theo Van Cino portrait given to Sharlot Hall

    Theo Van Cino portrait photo signed and given to Sharlot Hall.

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  • The Hall Family Portrait

    The Hall Family - Sharlot with her mother, Adeline, father, James, and brother, Edward "Ted."

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  • Stone at Sharlot Hall Museum erected by General Crook

    Stone at Sharlot Hall Museum erected by General Crook. Photo taken by Ernest and Molly Behrend during visit to museum. Ernst Richard Behrend (b.March 29, 1869, d. September 22,1940) was born in Germany and after receiving an engineering degree, he emigrated to the United States in 1896 and worked in the paper industry. After his father raised the investment capital to build a sulfite pulp and paper mill, he co-founded, with his father and brother, the Hammermill Paper Company in Erie, Pennsylvania. Mr. Behrend served as its president for its first 40 years, and by the late 1920’s, the company had about 80% of the paper market. He was a prominent civic leader in Erie, serving on a number of boards until his death in 1940. He was inducted into the Paper Industry International Hall of Fame in 2012. Mary Brownell Behrend (b.December 26,1879, d. July 5, 1976), nicknamed Molly, was a Newport, Rhode Island debutante before marrying Ernst Behrend in 1907. The couple had two children. Their only son died in a traffic accident in 1929, and after her husband’s death in 1940, she donated the family’s country estate, the Glenhill farmhouse and the 400 acres surrounding it, to Penn State University. The Behrend Center was dedicated in 1940 as a memorial to Ernst and it later became Penn State Erie, The Behrend College. Mrs. Behrend became known as the “mother” of Penn State Behrend.

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  • Snow-covered trees at Orchard Ranch

    Snow-covered trees beside Orchard Ranch house. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Sharlot, and her Uncle and Aunt Boblett

    Sharlot M. Hall (standing) with her Aunt Mary "May" Boblett and her Uncle Sam M. Boblett, prior to their move to Arizona.

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  • Sharlot's Pet Cat "Zeb"

    This is one of Sharlot M. Hall's pet cats, which she named Zeb.

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  • Sharlot with purse in traveling clothes

    Sharlot Hall in hat and traveling clothes by tree and suitcase.

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  • Sharlot standing in street wearing hat

    Sharlot Hall standing in street wearing hat.

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  • Sharlot standing by wall in hat

    Sharlot M. Hall standing by wall in hat and fancy dress.

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  • Sharlot standing by vine in hat and fancy dress

    Sharlot M. Hall standing by vine in hat and fancy dress.

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