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Sharlot M. Hall at eighteen years old
Water windmill at Orchard Ranch
Mary "May" Boblett at Ten Years Old
Horses, pigs and chickens at Orchard Ranch
Adeline Hall seated on rim of Grand Canyon
Sharlot seated and holding book
Adeline Hall Ironing Fabric
Sharlot in coat with fur collar
Sharlot Hall's Orchard Ranch in winter
Edward Leonard Boblett as a child
Orchard Ranch roof and orchards at left
Mr. and Mrs. William Tipton portrait
Orchard Ranch house from front in heavy snow
Sharlot Hall, S.E. Hewis & James Hall on log near Sunset Crater
Sharlot Hall's dog, Watch, standing
Sharlot Hall holding goose
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Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress

Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress

Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress & floral hat taken when she worked on the "Out West" magazine in California.


Sharlot M. Hall at twenty-two

Sharlot M. Hall at twenty-two

Sharlot M. Hall at twenty-two years old, head & shoulder shot


Sharlot with purse in traveling clothes

Sharlot with purse in traveling clothes

Sharlot Hall in hat and traveling clothes by tree and suitcase.


Orchard Ranch, Mayer, Arizona

Orchard Ranch, Mayer, Arizona

In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Sharlot M. Hall and James Hall on hill above Orchard Ranch

Sharlot M. Hall and James Hall on hill above Orchard Ranch

Sharlot M. Hall and her father, James Hall walking on hill above Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.


Sharlot M. Hall's Grandmother

Sharlot M. Hall's Grandmother

Sharlot M. Hall's Grandmother


Sharlot Hall standing by saguaro cactus

Sharlot Hall standing by saguaro cactus

Sharlot Hall standing by saguaro cactus. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot Hall sitting on Grand Canyon rim

Sharlot Hall sitting on Grand Canyon rim

Sharlot Hall sitting on rim with Grand Canyon in background on trip to northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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  • Water windmill at Orchard Ranch

    Water windmill at Orchard Ranch with James Hall standing below. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Washington School Kindergarten class at Governor's Mansion at Sharlot Hall Museum

    Washington School Kindergarten class in front of Governor's Mansion on Sharlot Hall Museum Grounds, Prescott, Arizona, c. 1928

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  • Uncle Dick Thomas of Dewey

    Uncle Dick Thomas of Dewey. On the back of 1928-001-i324, Edward Hall on horseback.

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  • Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress

    Two views of Sharlot in long striped dress & floral hat taken when she worked on the "Out West" magazine in California.

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  • Tree on Orchard Ranch

    Tree on hill above Orchard Ranch.

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  • Theo Van Cino portrait given to Sharlot Hall

    Theo Van Cino portrait photo signed and given to Sharlot Hall.

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  • The Hall Family Portrait

    The Hall Family - Sharlot with her mother, Adeline, father, James, and brother, Edward "Ted."

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  • Stone at Sharlot Hall Museum erected by General Crook

    Stone at Sharlot Hall Museum erected by General Crook. Photo taken by Ernest and Molly Behrend during visit to museum. Ernst Richard Behrend (b.March 29, 1869, d. September 22,1940) was born in Germany and after receiving an engineering degree, he emigrated to the United States in 1896 and worked in the paper industry. After his father raised the investment capital to build a sulfite pulp and paper mill, he co-founded, with his father and brother, the Hammermill Paper Company in Erie, Pennsylvania. Mr. Behrend served as its president for its first 40 years, and by the late 1920’s, the company had about 80% of the paper market. He was a prominent civic leader in Erie, serving on a number of boards until his death in 1940. He was inducted into the Paper Industry International Hall of Fame in 2012. Mary Brownell Behrend (b.December 26,1879, d. July 5, 1976), nicknamed Molly, was a Newport, Rhode Island debutante before marrying Ernst Behrend in 1907. The couple had two children. Their only son died in a traffic accident in 1929, and after her husband’s death in 1940, she donated the family’s country estate, the Glenhill farmhouse and the 400 acres surrounding it, to Penn State University. The Behrend Center was dedicated in 1940 as a memorial to Ernst and it later became Penn State Erie, The Behrend College. Mrs. Behrend became known as the “mother” of Penn State Behrend.

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  • Snow-covered trees at Orchard Ranch

    Snow-covered trees beside Orchard Ranch house. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • Sharlot, and her Uncle and Aunt Boblett

    Sharlot M. Hall (standing) with her Aunt Mary "May" Boblett and her Uncle Sam M. Boblett, prior to their move to Arizona.

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  • Sharlot's Pet Cat "Zeb"

    This is one of Sharlot M. Hall's pet cats, which she named Zeb.

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  • Sharlot with purse in traveling clothes

    Sharlot Hall in hat and traveling clothes by tree and suitcase.

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  • Sharlot standing in street wearing hat

    Sharlot Hall standing in street wearing hat.

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  • Sharlot standing by wall in hat

    Sharlot M. Hall standing by wall in hat and fancy dress.

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  • Sharlot standing by vine in hat and fancy dress

    Sharlot M. Hall standing by vine in hat and fancy dress.

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