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Sharlot in large floral hat facing left
Orchard Ranch rooftops
Orchard Ranch Water Tank and Apple Cellar
Sharlot with purse in traveling clothes
Sharlot Hall, President Coolidge and officials
Adeline Hall Ironing Fabric
James Hall funeral pallbearers
Orchard Ranch house from front in heavy snow
Sharlot M. Hall in front of Governor's Mansion
Sharlot seated and holding book
Adeline Hall with glasses on top of head
James Hall seated holding open book
Sharlot M. Hall and Ernest and Molly Behrend at Sharlot Hall Museum
Sharlot Hall sitting on stone by flagpole
Sharlot and James Hall at Grand Canyon
Horses and cows before fence at Orchard Ranch
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Sharlot Hall, Alice Hewins and Harrison Conrad with dogs

Sharlot Hall, Alice Hewins and Harrison Conrad with dogs

Sharlot Hall (L),Alice Hewins(C) and Harrison Conrad with two dogs on trip to Northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Alice Butterfield Hewins (b. May 26, 1878, d. October 3, 1963) was born in Sacramento, California, graduated from Stanford University with a degree in Library Science and in 1901 joined her mother and her mother's husband, W. P. Nichols, in Phoenix. She taught at Stanford and the University of Arizona and helped organize the Phoenix Library where she later worked as assistant librarian. In 1904 she met Sharlot Hall, who became her lifelong friend. She married Levi Edwin Hewins in 1907 and they frequently visited Sharlot at Orchard Ranch until Levi's death in 1936. She became a resident of the Arizona Pioneer Home in 1963 shortly before her death.


Sharlot M. Hall and Molly Behrend and deer at Sharlot Hall Museum

Sharlot M. Hall and Molly Behrend and deer at Sharlot Hall Museum

Sharlot M. Hall and Molly Behrend and deer at Sharlot Hall Museum.In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.Mary Brownell Behrend (b.December 26,1879, d. July 5, 1976), nicknamed Molly, was a Newport, Rhode Island debutante before marrying Ernst Behrend in 1907. The couple had two children. Their only son died in a traffic accident in 1929, and after her husband’s death in 1940, she donated the family’s country estate, the Glenhill farmhouse and the 400 acres surrounding it, to Penn State University. The Behrend Center was dedicated in 1940 as a memorial to Ernst and it later became Penn State Erie, The Behrend College. Mrs. Behrend became known as the “mother” of Penn State Behrend.


Sharlot Hall and Samuel Dickson at Blythe Bridge dedication

Sharlot Hall and Samuel Dickson at Blythe Bridge dedication

Sharlot M. Hall and Samuel S. Dickson, U. S. Consul to San Salvador at dedication of Blythe Bridge. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot M. Hall in front of Governor's Mansion

Sharlot M. Hall in front of Governor's Mansion

Sharlot M. Hall standing in front of Governor's Mansion.


Sharlot Hall holding rifle standing before dog

Sharlot Hall holding rifle standing before dog

Sharlot Hall holding rifle and standing before dog. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot Hall with Col. and Mrs. Luxmoore and Kate Cory

Sharlot Hall with Col. and Mrs. Luxmoore and Kate Cory

Mrs. Luxmoore, Sharlot Hall, and Kate Coury seated on bench,l. to r. with Col. Luxmoore in foreground, at Frontier Day. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Lt. Col. Charles T. P. Luxmoore served in the suppression of the mutiny in Bengal in 1857-58, at the capture of Lucknow, and in several other Indian military campaigns as a British army officer. He was active in the YMCA in India. He and his wife visited Prescott and attended the July 4, 1924 Frontier Day Rodeo with Sharlot Hall and Kate Cory. Kate Thomson Cory (b. February 8, 1861, d. June 12, 1958) was born in Waukegan, Illinois and studied art at the Cooper Union in New York City. She worked as a commercial artist before traveling to Arizona in 1905 where she hoped to start an artist colony on the Hopi reservation at Oraibi. She lived among the Hopi for seven years, participating in their rituals and ceremonies, painting and taking more than 500 photographs of tribal members. In 1912 she moved to Prescott where she became a well-known artist and sculptor, as well as an acknowledged expert on Native American customs. She participated in the design and furnishing of the Smoki Museum where some of her paintings are displayed. She was a close friend of Sharlot Hall, was at her bedside when she died, and is buried beside her in the Pioneer Cemetery in Prescott.


Sharlot Hall in hat standing before large bush

Sharlot Hall in hat standing before large bush

Sharlot Hall in hat standing before large bush on trip to northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot Hall, woman, man and 2 children

Sharlot Hall, woman, man and 2 children

Sharlot Hall in hat standing with unidentified woman at left of door and 2 children and man at right of door. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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