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Sharlot M. Hall in Copper Dress - Seated Facing Forward
Sharlot Hall and Mrs. Clark
Sharlot M. Hall in front of museum on Capitol Rd.
Sharlot Hall with Col. and Mrs. Luxmoore and Kate Cory
Sharlot Hall stone building at museum
Sharlot M. Hall and dog before Pauline Weaver's memorial
Sharlot Hall leaning over and feeding pigs
Alice J. Stevens Tipton sitting at desk
Sharlot Hall, Governor & Mrs. LaGuardia and officials
Sharlot Hall standing on rock with two men
James Hall seated holding open book
Adeline Hall seated with book in lap
Sharlot Hall, one woman and four men panning for gold at Lynx Creek.
Washington School Kindergarten class at Governor's Mansion at Sharlot Hall Museum
Sharlot M. Hall at eleven years old
Sharlot in profile facing right
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Mr. and Mrs. William Tipton

Mr. and Mrs. William Tipton

William and Alice Tipton standing on steps in front of tree.


Sharlot Hall having Tea with Friends

Sharlot Hall having Tea with Friends

Sharlot standing and pouring tea to two men and a woman.


Sharlot M. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Behrend in front of museum buildings

Sharlot M. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Behrend in front of museum buildings

Sharlot M. Hall standing with Mr. and Mrs. Behrend in front of Museum buildings .In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. October 27, 1870, d. April 9, 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governors Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Mary Brownell Behrend (b.December 26,1879, d. July 5, 1976), nicknamed Molly, was a Newport, Rhode Island debutante before marrying Ernst Behrend in 1907. The couple had two children. Their only son died in a traffic accident in 1929, and after her husband’s death in 1940, she donated the family’s country estate, the Glenhill farmhouse and the 400 acres surrounding it, to Penn State University. The Behrend Center was dedicated in 1940 as a memorial to Ernst and it later became Penn State Erie, The Behrend College. Mrs. Behrend became known as the “mother” of Penn State Behrend. Ernst Richard Behrend (b. March 29,1869, d. September 22, 1940) was born in Germany and after receiving an engineering degree, he emigrated to the United States in 1896 and worked in the paper industry. After his father raised the investment capital to build a sulfite pulp and paper mill, he co-founded, with his father and brother, the Hammermill Paper Company in Erie, Pennsylvania. Mr. Behrend served as its president for its first 40 years, and by the late 1920’s, the company had about 80% of the paper market. He was a prominent civic leader in Erie, serving on a number of boards until his death in 1940. He was inducted into the Paper Industry International Hall of Fame in 2012.


Sharlot Hall bottle-feeding piglet in her lap

Sharlot Hall bottle-feeding piglet in her lap

Sharlot Hall bottle-feeding piglet in lap at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Mary "May" Boblett at Ten Years Old

Mary "May" Boblett at Ten Years Old

Mary "May (Boblett) Hall Ross (b. July 29, 1871; d. January 21, 1966) is Sharlot M. Hall's niece and was born in Kansas to John C. and Amanda Boblett. She came to Arizona with her family in 1877


Edward "Ted" Hall Seated & Reading Book

Edward "Ted" Hall Seated & Reading Book

Edward "Ted" Hall seated reading book in profile. Edward V. Hall (Ted) (b. March 11, 1874, d. September 26, 1928), Sharlot Hall's brother, was born to James and Adeline Hall in Kansas in 1874.


Sharlot and James Hall and Alice Hewins climbing Sunset Crater

Sharlot and James Hall and Alice Hewins climbing Sunset Crater

Sharlot Hall, Alice Hewins and James Hall climbing Sunset Crater on trip to Northern Arizona. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Alice Butterfield Hewins (b. May 26, 1878, d. October 3, 1963) was born in Sacramento, California, graduated from Stanford University with a degree in Library Science and in 1901 joined her mother and her mother's husband, W. P. Nichols, in Phoenix. She taught at Stanford and the University of Arizona and helped organize the Phoenix Library where she later worked as assistant librarian. In 1904 she met Sharlot Hall, who became her lifelong friend. She married Levi Edwin Hewins in 1907 and they frequently visited Sharlot at Orchard Ranch until Levi's death in 1936. She became a resident of the Arizona Pioneer Home in 1963 shortly before her death.James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.


Men on hay wagon at Orchard Ranch

Men on hay wagon at Orchard Ranch

Two men on top of hay wagon at Orchard Ranch. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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