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Sharlot Hall in hat standing before large bush
Sharlot M. Hall reading in office
Sharlot reading and leaning on desk
Sharlot Hall and large group of first movie colony
Graining stones at Sharlot Hall Museum
Water windmill at Orchard Ranch
Sharlot Hall's Funeral Casket
Sharlot in Lace Collar Dress
Sharlot M. Hall Standing with Draped Lace
Orchard Ranch house from rear with hill in background
Sharlot Hall, Emma Andres & America Tomlinson
Edward & Samuel Boblett as Children
Sharlot Hall standing among rocks beside saguaro
Washington School Kindergarten class at Governor's Mansion at Sharlot Hall Museum
John Mahony and Ginger at musuem
Sharlot Hall riding plow behind horses
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Sharlot Hall and two women at Pauline Weaver's stone

Sharlot Hall and two women at Pauline Weaver's stone

Sharlot Hall and two women standing at Pauline Weaver's commemorative stone. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


Sharlot M. Hall from glass plate negative, damaged with large white blot in center

Sharlot M. Hall from glass plate negative, damaged with large white blot in center

Sharlot M. Hall from glass plate negative, damaged with large white blot in center.


The Hall Family Portrait

The Hall Family Portrait

The Hall Family - Sharlot with her mother, Adeline, father, James, and brother, Edward "Ted."


Horses, pigs and chickens at Orchard Ranch

Horses, pigs and chickens at Orchard Ranch

Horses, pigs, chickens and men in front of wagon at Orchard Ranch in winter. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.


Sharlot Hall with Col. and Mrs. Luxmoore and Kate Cory

Sharlot Hall with Col. and Mrs. Luxmoore and Kate Cory

Mrs. Luxmoore, Sharlot Hall, and Kate Coury seated on bench,l. to r. with Col. Luxmoore in foreground, at Frontier Day. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths. She returned to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion in Prescott was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum (1928) that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Lt. Col. Charles T. P. Luxmoore served in the suppression of the mutiny in Bengal in 1857-58, at the capture of Lucknow, and in several other Indian military campaigns as a British army officer. He was active in the YMCA in India. He and his wife visited Prescott and attended the July 4, 1924 Frontier Day Rodeo with Sharlot Hall and Kate Cory. Kate Thomson Cory (b. February 8, 1861, d. June 12, 1958) was born in Waukegan, Illinois and studied art at the Cooper Union in New York City. She worked as a commercial artist before traveling to Arizona in 1905 where she hoped to start an artist colony on the Hopi reservation at Oraibi. She lived among the Hopi for seven years, participating in their rituals and ceremonies, painting and taking more than 500 photographs of tribal members. In 1912 she moved to Prescott where she became a well-known artist and sculptor, as well as an acknowledged expert on Native American customs. She participated in the design and furnishing of the Smoki Museum where some of her paintings are displayed. She was a close friend of Sharlot Hall, was at her bedside when she died, and is buried beside her in the Pioneer Cemetery in Prescott.


Adeline Hall in kitchen of Orchard Ranch

Adeline Hall in kitchen of Orchard Ranch

Adeline Susannah (Boblett) Hall, Sharlot Hall's mother, standing in kitchen of Orchard Ranch.


Sharlot M. Hall holding bouquet of roses

Sharlot M. Hall holding bouquet of roses

Sharlot M. Hall holding bouquet of roses before large tree.


Sharlot Hall in carriage before barrel cactus

Sharlot Hall in carriage before barrel cactus

Sharlot Hall sitting in horse-drawn carriage with barrel cactus in foreground. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address.


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Sharlot M. Hall, SHM MS-12

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  • James and Adeline Hall in garden at Orchard Ranch

    James and Adeline Hall in garden at Orchard Ranch in winter. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot. Adeline Susannah Boblett Hall (b. December 23,1844, d. August 24,1912) was born in Dayton, Ohio to John Boblett and his wife. Her mother died when she was a small child and her father moved the family to Iowa where he married Elisabeth Hosier in 1854. Adeline served as a nurse during the Civil War,and in 1867 she began teaching school in Minneapolis, Kansas, before meeting and marrying James Hall in 1869. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • James Hall and horse at Orchard Ranch

    James Hall and his horse in front of Orchard Ranch house. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot. Orchard Ranch was built in 1890 on land at the lower end of Lynx Creek valley by James Hall. It was built in the shape of a T with a crossbar running east and west and included two porches, a well and a tank. It faced the highway between Camp Verde and Prescott. From 1890-1895, apple, pear and peach trees were planted, and 120 head of cattle were raised by the Hall family. After the death of James Hall, the ranchhouse and 320 acres were sold in 1929 to Edward G. Applegate. In the following years, it was neglected, and became run down. It was rented occasionally until it was declared unfit for habitation and razed around 1966.

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  • James Hall at water canal at Orchard Ranch

    James Hall, father of Sharlot Hall, standing at water canal with cows at Orchard Ranch. James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, died September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Mabridth, was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline's father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory's town of Prescott, James and Adeline's brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and James continued to live at Orchard Ranch until his death on September 3, 1925.

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  • James Hall feeding peacocks at Orchard Ranch

    James Hall feeding peacocks at Orchard Ranch.

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  • James Hall funeral pallbearers

    James Hall's, Sharlot M. Hall's father, funeral pallbearers and mourners.

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  • James Hall in neck scarf facing right

    James Hall in neck scarf facing right, head and shoulders.

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  • James Hall in overalls before tree

    James Hall in overalls before tree.

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  • James Hall seated holding open book

    James Hall, Sharlot Hall's father, seated with open book in lap, facing forward.

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  • James Hall seated looking down at open book

    James Hall seated with open book in lap, looking down.

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  • James Hall stoking stove at Orchard Ranch

    James Hall stoking stove at Orchard Ranch.

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  • James Hall with Sharlot Hall and Alice Hewins holding flowers

    James Hall with Sharlot Hall (R)and Alice Hewins holding flowers. In 1882, Sharlot Mabridth Hall (b. 1870, d. 1943) moved from Lincoln County, Kansas to Lynx Creek, Arizona, 12 miles southeast of Prescott, with her father, James Knox Hall, her mother, Adeline Susannah Hall, and her brother, Edward V. Hall (Ted). She became a poet, penning a book of poetry, Cactus and Pine, and a journalist, also serving a stint as editor of Out West Magazine. In 1909, she became the first woman to hold public office in Arizona when she was appointed Territorial Historian. After leaving office in 1912, she cared for her aging parents at their farm, Orchard Ranch, until their deaths, returning to public life in 1924 when she was selected as elector to carry Arizona's vote to Washington, D. C. In 1927, her long-time dream was realized when the original Territorial Governor's Mansion was leased to her for life, and she became the steward of the museum that now bears her name. During this period she also was a popular speaker before civic and professional groups throughout Arizona. She died on April 9, 1943, and her funeral was a large affair held at the museum, with the Governor giving the principal address. Alice Butterfield Hewins (b. May 26, 1878, d. October 3, 1963) was born in Sacramento, California, graduated from Stanford University with a degree in Library Science and in 1901 joined her mother and her mother's husband, W. P. Nichols, in Phoenix. She taught at Stanford and the University of Arizona and helped organize the Phoenix Library where she later worked as assistant librarian. In 1904 she met Sharlot Hall, who became her lifelong friend. She married Levi Edwin Hewins in 1907 and they frequently visited Sharlot at Orchard Ranch until Levi's death in 1936. She became a resident of the Arizona Pioneer Home in 1963 shortly before her death.James Knox Polk Hall (b. December 2, 1844, d. September 3, 1925) was born in Missouri to Mary Bradley Hall, who died shortly after his birth, and John Wesley Hall, who left him in the care of a neighbor, eventually dying in 1859 in Olathe, Kansas. James was raised in a crude frontier settlement and had no formal education. He enlisted in a Kansas regiment during the Civil War and worked as a scout, guide, and buffalo hunter on the Kansas plains until meeting and marrying Adeline Susannah Boblett on January 31, 1869. They lived on Prosser Creek in Lincoln County, Kansas where their first child, Sharlot Madridth was born on October 27, 1870, followed in 1874 by a son, Edward V. (Ted). In 1879 the family moved to a region of ranches north of Indian Territory (Oklahoma) line where James turned to cattle ranching. After Adeline’s father located a mining claim in the Lynx Creek area near the Arizona Territory’s town of Prescott, James Hall and Adeline’s brother, Sam Boblett, moved their families to Arizona in 1881. The Halls found a small ranch in an area called Lonesome Valley, where they began raising cattle. Adeline died in 1912 and he operated Orchard Ranch for many years thereafter with the help of Sharlot.

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  • James Hall's funeral procession

    James Knox Polk Hall's, Sharlot's father, funeral procession.

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  • James Knox Polk Hall Casket

    James Hall casket behind bushes.

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  • James Knox Polk Hall Funeral Mourners

    James Hall funeral mourners from behind.

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  • James Knox Polk Hall Portrait

    James Knox Polk Hall, Sharlot's father, in 3-piece suit, head & shoulders portrait

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Items 46 to 60 of 324 total

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